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Sleep Talking, Waking Up And Still Talking Before I Realise What I Am Doing

by Carla
(South Africa)

Hello :)


Well I have a very close relationship with my boyfriend and we can really talk about anything. In the last few months I find myself waking up several times a night, talking to him. But we are still in school so he is definitely not with me. The thing is, I wake up and realise that I am talking, then I still carry on talking and then I get angry at him because he is not replying and find myself glaring at the wall, then I realise that he is not there. My mom says that we are probably thinking about each other subconsciously, but it can get very annoying, since I never get enough sleep anymore. I never remember what I was talking to him about only a few words like "okay" "yes" "no" "I also think so" "not sure will find out".

Just before I was about to tell my boyfriend about this and he said that he wakes up a few times a night while reaching for me. He says he 'sees me' and then when he wants to touch me I disappear. He will text me in the morning and tell me what happened, and that same night I would've been 'talking to him'. We find it quite interesting but we would really like to know why this happens and why it happens to both of us :)

Thank you

P.S. I have never been on such an interesting site. I read nearly all the sleep walking and talking articles. It was very informative and I really enjoyed it =)



Kevin: Hey Carla. I'm really glad you enjoyed reading through the site :) It's quite an interesting experience you write about here. I certainly can't tell you how you and your boyfriend managed to reach out and talk to each other on the same nights. Maybe it's a good sign for your relationship though ;)

In terms of waking up and continuing to talk without realizing your boyfriend wasn't there, that could be partly due to a phenomenon called sleep inertia, which basically just refers to those brief moments of confusion you feel just after waking up. I haven't heard anything really before about sleep talking continuing on into wakefulness.

So I can't offer too much specific insight, but I thought sleep inertia was worth mentioning here. Anyone else have any thoughts?

Warmly,
Kevin

Comments for Sleep Talking, Waking Up And Still Talking Before I Realise What I Am Doing

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Nov 27, 2012
!!!! NEW
by: Courtney k

I wake up every morning in the middle of a sentence! It started like a month ago. I used to occasionally sleep talk and that used to wake me up but I would always know what I just said. But now I wake up finishing a sentence but i can never remember the beginning. This morning when I woke up (because my alarm was going off) I was saying "...but tomorrow I might" it's so annoying to me. After finishing my words i feel overly frustrated. I start nearly every morning this way.

Jan 07, 2014
Talking in my sleep and waking up still talking NEW
by: Anonymous

Hi - I just noticed this week January. 7, 2014 that I was talking in my sleep and I woke up around 5am still talking. Then I looked around and thought my husband was in bed with me. My husband died 5 years ago at the age of 70. I am 75. I remember saying a few words to him out loud. I am a very anxious person and I am due for surgery next week, does this mean that I will be joining my husband? This is the first time I have heard myself talk out loud. Do I need to see a doctor?
Lynn

Dec 18, 2014
Waking up and still talking NEW
by: Heather

I am so glad I'm not alone. I know we can all talk in our sleep for one reason or another, but this morning Thursday 18th December 2014 I woke muttering something and yes I had woken my hubby, it must have been around 6am I'm afraid he couldn't go off again so got up. I went off again no problem but woke at about 8-15am I was talking and couldn't stop for some time it was like having to finish what I saying about my great grandson who is only 7 mths old and a little love. A couple days ago I woke up and found myself sitting on the side of my bed, what was that all about?. One last point I have sleep apnea and that's enough to handle now I'm talking what can I expect next?

Dec 18, 2014
Waking up and still talking NEW
by: Heather

I am so glad I'm not alone. I know we can all talk in our sleep for one reason or another, but this morning Thursday 18th December 2014 I woke muttering something and yes I had woken my hubby, it must have been around 6am I'm afraid he couldn't go off again so got up. I went off again no problem but woke at about 8-15am I was talking and couldn't stop for some time it was like having to finish what I saying about my great grandson who is only 7 mths old and a little love. A couple days ago I woke up and found myself sitting on the side of my bed, what was that all about?. One last point I have sleep apnea and that's enough to handle now I'm talking what can I expect next?

Aug 20, 2015
New NEW
by: Anonymous

I get this aswell. Sometimes I feel like loads of my friends are in my room talking to me, I wake up and have conversations with them without realising. I get embarrassed about my pyjamas in front of them, and it really feels like they're there! Also if I've had a long shift at work I sometiems wake up talking to customers, and carry on, I even reach up for the forks to give them (as I work in a cafe). It's really weird, and I have really disrupted sleep because of it! I have to fully snap myself out of it, and tell myself it's not real that it could be happening to be able to get back to sleep, or I'll keep waking up and doing it!

Sep 18, 2015
Waking up and still talking/walking NEW
by: Ashlie

In response to August 20, 2015's post I do the exact same thing. I find myself talking to people in my room when they are not there, customers from work, earlier this morning (it is currently 5:20am) I was trying to make coffee for my boyfriend (we live together and I work at a coffee shop) but almost every single time I sleep talk or sit up in bed and look around or walk around briefly I end up waking myself up. I get very upset because I realize I'm doing it and I try to convince myself I'm just sleeping and to lay back down but I generally pick right back up within a few minutes. Most of the time I don't remember exactly what it was that I was doing or speaking of, but I know I tend to deliberately wake my boyfriend whom doesn't usually remember by the time he wakes up for the day. Today/tonight has been the worst in awhile. I've always suffered from sleep talking/walking (I even drove down the street once) since I was little and medical sleep aides make it worse. I just moved to a new city within the last 4 months which is the first time I've lived away from my family and I transferred with my company so I'm working with a whole new staff and was recently promoted to manager so I have taken on a ton of new and important responsibilities that I know for a fact has me stressed out. I know that may have a lot to do with it. When I was in middle school I remember urinating in my clothes hamper in my closet during a sleepover which has haunted me for years and I guess one other time I attempted to urinate in the hallway but was heard by someone and they brought me to the bathroom (thank god). This is embarrassing for sure but something I had no control over. Lastly, I've noticed over the last couple months I wake up startled to the point of crying or having a minor anxiety attack, usually when my boyfriend wakes me up before he leaves for work. He does this so I don't wake up freaked out that he isn't there because he knows I sometimes feel uneasy that someone may be in our apartment or is trying to get in (due to a recent incident). I apologize for the novel but I am relieved to hear others out there can relate and I am absolutely exhausted from this evening and I can't fall back asleep so I figured I'd give this a try.

Oct 09, 2015
Why NEW
by: LoveDragons

Sometimes when am dreaming about nothing in particular I start talking in my sleep but i sometimes hear myself and it wakes me up upon waking up is when the last few words or word come out most times i fall back asleep then other times it takes me a few mins but really some nights i hardly get any sleep as this sometimes happen 3-4 times in one night .

Nov 10, 2015
Sleep talking keeping my wife awake NEW
by: Tim

Hello, I stumbled upon this site looking for answers, I'm 59 years old disabled and have sleep apnea, To me I sleep like a log but my wife tells me a Talk, shout, and burst out laughing while I'm asleep "new's to me since i'm asleep" and this is not allowing her to sleep, based on what she has told me I have searched and find no answers, should she call the men in their white coat's to come get me?? Help!

Tim

Dec 03, 2015
In response to August 20, 2015's NEW
by: Nessa

I suffer from the same experience as you. I recently got a new job at a Chinese restaurant and there's a lot to learn. It's my first time working in a restaurant and I want to do well as there are other people wanting the same job. Ever since I got the job, I have been waking up during the night and staring at nothing believing that my manager is telling me something. I know I'm awake but I can't shake myself out of the trance I'm in. I can feel how tired I am so I lay back down to go to sleep but then my manager says I can't forget what she's telling me so I jolt back upright and reply and continue to stare at nothing. Sometimes, I suddenly jump right out of my bed and walk over to the TV cabinet in my room or work desk and try looking for something continuously asking "where is it" or something along those lines. Then my eyes focus properly and I realize I'm not in the restaurant. I scold myself, telling myself that my shift ended hours ago (as this usually occurs around 2am in the morning) and that it isn't real. Most of the time, the scolding works and I lay down and sleep until morning, but sometime I wake up again during the night. Usually, when I convince myself it isn't real, I'm able to fall asleep again.
I believe this issue is caused by me stressing about how I want to do well at my job and other things I'm worried about that I can usually push aside and not think about during the day but during the night, as I have nothing to distract myself with, all I have left to do is to think about what I'm worried about or for. I can remember the next morning exactly what happened during the night, to the point when I first open my eyes. In my mind the next day, I can see myself sitting cross legged on my bed in darkness staring at the TV across from me agreeing and nodding at what I think I'm hearing as that was what really happens.
I think I know the reason behind this issue, however it is very difficult to stop or cure and has ruined my sleeping schedule. I am constantly tired every day, which does not help my concentration in the restaurant.

Apr 18, 2016
I get up have full conversations but I'm still asleep NEW
by: Anonymous

I have a problem waking up. First I would roll over when my wife would wake me up in the middle of the night, but now I respond to her, saying god knows what, get up start walking around not aware of what I'm doing until I snap out of it and see what's going on. Can anyone help me figure out why I can't wake up?

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